Our Cement

As the most widely used construction material and one of the planet’s most-consumed resources, cement forms the backbone of our modern civilization. It’s the hidden ingredient giving strength to the concrete and mortar that form our buildings, roads and everything in between.

Modern Portland cement can trace its roots to 1756 when a British civil engineer experimented with various limestones and additives to construct a lighthouse. The name “Portland” comes from the cement’s similarity to Portland stone, which is quarried in England on the Isle of Portland.

Type I – Otherwise known as normal Portland cement, Type I is a common-purpose cement for general construction uses, including pavements, concrete buildings, floors, precast concrete products and other uses.

Type I/II – Our Type I/II Portland cement meets the requirements of both Type I and Type II, including strength and composition requirements, and can be used in projects where either type is required. More cost-effective than storing both types, Type I/II can be used on most concrete construction projects, including those that expose the concrete to harsh environmental conditions.

Type III – Ground finer with a quicker reaction time than Type I, concrete made with Type III has a high early strength rate. It has a higher 28-day strength than Type I, achieving approximately 70 percent of that strength after three days.

Type V – Type V cement can be utilized when high sulfate resistance is required, such as in structures exposed to soils or ground waters with a high sulfate content. Type V cement generally develops strength at a slower rate than Type I and has a lower heat of hydration.

Download Safety & Test Data:

Our Cement

As the most widely used construction material and one of the planet’s most-consumed resources, cement forms the backbone of our modern civilization. It’s the hidden ingredient giving strength to the concrete and mortar that form our buildings, roads and everything in between.

Modern Portland cement can trace its roots to 1756 when a British civil engineer experimented with various limestones and additives to construct a lighthouse. The name “Portland” comes from the cement’s similarity to Portland stone, which is quarried in England on the Isle of Portland.

Our Type I/II Portland cement meets the requirements of both Type I and Type II, including strength and composition requirements, and can be used in projects where either type is required. More cost-effective than storing both types, Type I/II can be used on most concrete construction projects, including those that expose the concrete to harsh environmental conditions.